2 April – 30 May 2020

‘Observateur des Oiseau’ – Sue Gilford – Pyrographs

and

‘Pilbara’ – Margaret Lees – Oil pastels

‘Observateur des Oiseau’pyrographs by Sue Gilford will be shown upstairs and ‘Pilbara’ – oil pastels by Margaret Lees will be downstairs.

Pyrogravure or pyrography is the art of hand-engraving on a flat or three-dimensional surface using a heated object such as a poker or needle. The term “writing with fire” derives from the Greek pur and graphos. It is a technique used by Sue Gilford from South Gippsland.

As a passionate observer of birds and a skilled pyrographer, Sue Gilford burns, engraves, draws and paints intricate linear patterns and detailed depictions of native birds, insects, animals and plants in the Australian environment. Some works are framed works on paper, others are burnt onto boab nuts, seeds and self-grown gourds as well as on actual timber surfaces. Particularly fascinating are the series of actual guitars embellished with detailed bird and animal imagery.

Sue’s inspiration is derived from her love of the forms and colours of the natural world. Her work has been acquired by the South Australian Gallery, the National Gallery, Victoria and the National Gallery, Canberra.

Accompanying these arresting works is an equally superb exhibition of oil pastels by Margaret Lees entitled ‘Pilbara’. She too is a keen bushwalker, hiker and lover of the natural world. Two years ago Margaret exhibited a series of oil pastels and linocuts at Falkner Gallery of the Kimberley, following one of her many visits there. It was a highly successful and popular exhibition with images that glowed and vibrated with the luscious patterns and hot, burgundy colours of the north.

This new exhibition ‘Pilbara’ continues the theme of north-western Australian landscapes, this time based on her travels in the Pilbara. Amidst the fiery reds, oranges and pinks lie part-hidden wallabies foraging amongst the undergrowth and twisted tree trunks. Margaret’s decorative and stylised works are enriched by their pulsating rich colours.

The contrasting areas of north-western and south-eastern Australia show the magnificence of our bushland and natural world. At this devastating time for our country, affected communities and wildlife, both exhibitions give us cause for sadness and reflection.

Further representative works by each artist may be seen by clicking their images at: www.falknergallery.com.au.

These exhibitions will be accompanied throughout the gallery by new works by various artists such as John Lloyd, Robert Marnika, Jean Marc Laroque, Margaret Cromb, Jane Rusden, Liz Caffin, Tarli Glover and others.